Monday, June 30, 2008

It's a Macro World After All...

Cue the music, "It's a small world after all..."

I LOVE doing macro photography. Pretty much nutty about it, really (OK we can use the word, obsessive here). It's whole 'nother universe within itself (wasn't that part of the message in "Horton Hear's a Who"?).

When I noticed this little feather stuck to a lavendar in my garden, it warranted a shot in spite of the very gusty wind that evening (you can see the motion within the feather if you look close enough).

And when my Sigma 50mm macro lens came in the other week, this was one of my test shots.

This icicle was from winter '07. There is often a repeating theme in much of what I do with photography and I think the examples I have here demonstrate that. And no, macro is not necessarily the repeating theme (I consider it a technique).

I love this peeling paint on an old door in Magdelena, NM. These weathered surfaces have so much to tell us! If only they would...

More peeling paint in Magdelena but this is on an old abandoned Santa Fe Railway train. I loved this one so much that I made a poster sized print of it!

My climbing White Iceberg; I like the rose hips after the bloom as much as I like the bloom!

Another "from-my-garden" specimen. This one is called Bridal Veil and is also known as Babies Breath. It's a perennial and is very easy to grow.

OK, so one of the things that I am a HOUND about has to do with textures and patterns (of course color and light have heavy play in this too). Most of these images have to do with textures and patterns. I also like to tell a story with my images.

Detail from a bovine skull. I love the way those lines move; it makes me want to do a pen and ink version of it. When I get a 'round tuit' I will, but don't hold your breath! ; )

Detail of a Buddah that sits on a shelf on my front porch. My teenage son challenged me with, "hey how does THAT fit in with being Catholic?" All I have to say is that this man walked the earth before Christ and had a lot of wise things to say and teach about spirituality. There are many ways to achieve spirituality and even Pope Pius (I don't know which one) said that there are many paths to divinity.

And here we have the details of the folds of his robe on this very wise man.

So, can you see it? I mean the repeating theme here. Textures and patterns. Go back and look again. It's all there.

And in this case, it's a macro, macro world!

7 comments:

laurel said...

Great details. I was supposed to spend Sunday playing with my macro lens. Alas, I was useless but I did get some laundry done. ;-)

smith kaich jones said...

I smiled when i saw your rose hip photo - I've got one I'll email you. And I have to admit here that I didn't know that's what the leftover bits were called. I thought rose hips were some other plant. I love the star shape.

I also really liked the pattern on the skull. It looks like embroidery - that white on white kind, whatever it's called (my knowledge of correct names for things is sadly lacking!) & is really beautiful.

:( Debi

robin bird said...

these are wonderful! i have been trying my hand (shaky though it is) at taking these detailed and rich photos in my own avalon. but alas it is not easy to stoop and be steady at the same time. and even the tripod is a challenge of various yoga positions. but you have managed some fabulous shots! i love the sepia baby's breath and skull look like an arial view of the amazon river :)

Jeanne said...

Your journal is so lovely indeed.
Much love
Jeanne

Jaime said...

I share your love of macro photography. It's like being a kid again and seeing something new for the very first time. Things look so different when you look at them up close.
That skull is fascinating! It looks as though someone doodled a happy little pattern on it!

Raine K said...

You are definitely the Queen of the Macro shot - changing my worldview one image at a time!
Love,
Raine

Paula Scott said...

Thanks, everyone for all the lovely comments!

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