Thursday, July 31, 2014

The Yellow Umbrellas (Christo and Jeanne-Claude) 1991

We were lucky enough to actually see one of Christo's and Jeanne-Claude's environmental works of art when we were living in Southern California in the year of 1991. I was not only able to take my mom to see it when she visited me, but also my brother Robert and our friend, Carol.

The area that the umbrellas were in was near the area that we called the Gorman Pass. We lived about 17 miles down the road in the suburbs of Castaic, CA.

If you don't know much about this monumental work of art (and of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's lifetime achievements), be sure to learn more about it here

Spectacular doesn't even begin to describe it. Currently, at The Albuquerque Art Museum, an exhibit is on display-notes, drawings, photos, etc. of the many projects that spanned over 40 years. Anyway, this is what got me to thinking about the fact that I had my own set of images and a fabric sample of the umbrellas that were in CA and Japan.

My mom and I: October, 1991


Carol, myself and my brother, Robert Mondoy: October, 1991

The underview...

Fabric samples-yellow for California and blue for Japan

Oddly enough, what I never realized until I saw the exhibit at the museum is that Christo and Jeanne-Claude FUNDED their own works. No grants, no private donations. And all of the projects tooks years and years of planning, meetings, environmental studies, you name it. Which is really staggering when you think about the fact that the Gates project in Central Park in New York City (Feb. 2005) cost them 21 million dollars. 21.You read that right.

Wow. Thank you, Christo and Jeanne-Claude!

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Simplified Beauty

"The beauty of shadows is that they are simplified, powerful shapes. All of the distracting details are gone." ~Linda Germain






Find out 3 ways to make cast shadows in your art making.












Loved the color of this blue wall on the side of a building-with a dramatic shadow to boot.

Come join us every week, as a group of us from around the world post our shadow shots over at Shadow Shot Sunday 2. Entertain your muse and be amused by stopping by to see what others have posted!

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Bisti Badlands Creatures

"Double Headed Hoodoo" © Paula Scott Molokai Girl Studio


A double headed creature of sorts that lives in the Bisti Badlands in the mid upper region of New Mexico. For photographers, we don't see it as a badland, but more of a photographer's paradise-full of eye candy waiting to be 'shot'. The terrain is spectacular and as you climb over each ridge, the color scheme can change to vibrant red and ochre earth tones to a monochromatic black, gray and white scene. Just like that. For miles and miles. The hoodoo formations are amazing as are some of the shapes of rocks-one area contains a 'garden' of what looks like egg-shaped rocks. Another area has rocks that look like cracked eggs. 

But, hey, if you want to know why badlands are called badlands, Wikipedia has a great explanation:

"Badlands are a type of dry terrain where softer sedimentary rocks and clay-rich soils have been extensively eroded by wind and water.[1] They are characterized by steep slopes, minimal vegetation, lack of a substantial regolith, and high drainage density.[2] They can resemble malpaís, a terrain of volcanic rock. Canyons, ravines, gullies, hoodoos and other such geological forms are common in badlands. They are often difficult to navigate by foot. Badlands often have a spectacular color display that alternates from dark black/blue coal stria to bright clays to red scoria."

"Hoodoo Bart Simpson" © Paula Scott Molokai Girl Studio


This one looks like a huge curtain of rock with Bart Simpson up on the left waving at everyone below. Yep. All those shapes and contours give this seemingly 'lifeless' land to be full of strange creatures standing as sentries for each other. I imagine they come to life at night and wander around visiting with each other and as soon as the sun's light starts to peek out over the horizon, they all scurry back to their respective stations. 

That's my story and I'm sticking with it!

Come join us every week, as a group of us from around the world post our shadow shots over at Shadow Shot Sunday 2. Entertain your muse and be amused by stopping by to see what others have posted!

Saturday, July 05, 2014

Tsé Bitʼaʼí-rock with wings





Have you ever been somewhere that touched your soul? In such a way that it becomes special and a place that you 'go to' in your mind/heart? I feel that way about the Chaco Canyon area, but last weekend I got to go to see Shiprock-which is the Anglo name given, but the Navajo call it Tsé Bitʼaʼí-rock with wings. Which really describes it so much more than Shiprock does, in my humble opinion! I have been back there several times now in my mind/heart. The nice thing about imagination is that there are no physical limitations. I find myself flying around the area. Does that sound too weird? Oh, well, no matter!

It is 'magical' and has lots of energy-good energy. The view you see here is on the west side of it-with the setting sun to our backs (I was in the area with a couple of photo buddies on a road trip, aka 'recess'). We were literally chasing the light that afternoon. Clouds kept the light off of the mountain and we'd wait and wait and watch a patch of light grow across the plain and hope that it would find its way up the mountain and bathe it in golden light. It was a cat and mouse game. I kept seeing rays of light coming up from the earth into the sky with my naked eyes and thought that perhaps the polarized lens on my sunglasses was causing an aberration. Later on, at home, when pulling the images up on my screen, I still see those rays of light. I only saw it from this vantage point (we were on the other side of the mountain earlier in the afternoon). Am I the only one who sees those rays or can any of you see them too? I don't know the explanation for that phenomenon, but it is pretty awesome!



This is the view from the southeast side of the mountain. We did drive up pretty close to it, so I do have images that are closer, but I like the rear view mirror view here (whew! that's a mouthful to say!).

We also went to the Bisti Wilderness area, but I'll save that for another post. I will say that I feel an addiction growing for that area though-there is so much to see and explore!

Come join us every week, as a group of us from around the world post our shadow shots over at Shadow Shot Sunday 2. Entertain your muse and be amused by stopping by to see what others have posted!

Saturday, June 28, 2014

The Proverbial Double Edged Sword!


"Beware of the Cactus Blossom!"  © Paula Scott Molokai Girl Studio


The delicate shadows on the delicate petals belie the characteristics of the rest of this cactus! Such duality at play here with the cactus plant offering the soft petals of the flower with such deadly thorns nestled around it. Certainly a 'look, but don't touch' kind of thing!

Definitely a double-edged sword. I'm not going anywhere near it-my camera's lens was close enough, thank you very much!

Come join us every week, as a group of us from around the world post our shadow shots over at Shadow Shot Sunday 2. Entertain your muse and be amused by stopping by to see what others have posted!

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